Apple II Computer

Apple II Computer

By Michael O'Shaughnessy
May 5, 2020

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” 1  A quote used in an Apple ad in May 1978, was very emblematic of both the design and functionalities of the Apple II computer. The development was led by both Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, starting in their garage and later moving to a Cupertino, CA office shortly before the official release of the computer. 2 Apple products have changed over the years dramatically but the company’s fundamental beliefs about personal computing were matured during the development of the Apple II and remain mostly unchanged to this day. 3  Steve Jobs had an appreciation for both Zen and simple aesthetics and wanted to apply these to his machine, while Steve Wozniak was more focused on the hardware of the machine and the small details about how things would be wired or connected. 4  With the collaboration of the two very different but interdependent minds, formed a computer that would change the course of computing. With its sleek lines and warm tones this computer appeared to be elegant yet powerful. Another important note of this innovative computer was that it was one of the first computers created aimed at the common man, not for hobbyists who wished to take apart the computer and install extra memory space or new speakers, but someone who wished to purchase a fully completed computer. Jobs recognized this was an untapped market at the time of the development of the Apple II. 5 . Both Jobs and Wozniak through the Apple company have made a name for themselves with their unique perspectives on computing as well as their mutual respect and friendship. This was the computer that began the Apple empire.


  1. Apple Computer, Inc., “Simplicity Is the Ultimate Sophistication: Introducing Apple II, the Personal Computer," Computer History Museum, https://archive.computerhistory.org/resources/text/Apple/Apple.II.1977.102637933.pdf.

  2. “The Apple II - CHM Revolution,” Computer History Museum, https://www.computerhistory.org/revolution/personal-computers/17/300.

  3. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2011), 70.

  4. Isaacson, 74.

  5. Isaacson, 71.

Apple II Computer